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Black Tea Goodness

Black Tea Goodness

It is no question that tea lovers tout green tea as THE miracle tea of choice. But what about its counterpart, the black tea? Don’t brush it off just yet. Scientists have discovered a whole host of health benefits linked to it. 

black tea goodness health benefits

What is Black Tea?

It is produced from the same kind of plant the green tea is – Camellia Sinensis. The only difference is how tea farmers process it. Leaves are withered, rolled, heated and then fermented and heated in order to produce delicious tea leaves.

Read more: Black Tea 101

Here are some of its health benefits.

Read more: Antioxidants – Why Do You Need Them?

black tea with muffin and journal
black tea in transparent tea pot

Health Benefits of Black Tea

1. Stress Relief

Black tea is ample in L-theanine, which helps you relax and concentrate. Regular consumption has also been found to lower cortisol levels.

2. Immune System Boost

It has alkylamine antigens and tannins which support the immune system, helping to ward off common everyday illnesses such as the flu and the tummy bug.

3. Lowers High Cholesterol

Research conducted by the American Heart Association concluded that black tea was associated with slower age-related decreases in HDL-C concentrations which is beneficial in reducing bad cholesterol, thus lowering the risk of heart strokes. People who drink 3-4 cups a day seems to be at a lower risk than people who consumed none at all. [1]

4. Oral Health

The Tea Trade Health Research Association discovered that it helps eliminate plaque formation. It seems to inhibit the growth of bacteria that promotes cavity formation and tooth decay. This is due to the polyphenol content that kill bacteria and the enzymes they create which bind plaque to the tooth enamel.

5. Energy Boost

It contains caffeine, albeit not in the skyrocket amounts that coffee does. It is sufficient however to provide a long lasting and steady boost of energy and mental clarity throughout the day.

What are you waiting for? Brew yourself some black tea goodness and drink up!

p.s. Shop for our Black Tea Collection.

References

[1] From Journal of the American Heart Association, (2018, June). Tea Consumption and Longitudinal Change in High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentration in Chinese Adultshttps://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.118.008814

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Black Tea Goodness

It is no question that tea lovers tout green tea as THE miracle tea of choice. But what about its counterpart, the black tea? Don’t brush it off just yet. Scientists have discovered a whole host of health benefits linked to it. 

read more

Black Tea 101

By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle. Eventually, it became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company.

read more

Black Tea 101

Black Tea 101

By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle.

Eventually, tea became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company. Generally, fully oxidized black tea became the favorite tea among European tea drinkers.

Even though China produces heavenly black teas, it is the least consumed class of tea in China. However, it is most widely consumed in India and Sri Lanka (formerly known as Ceylon during the British colonial days) and the West. In brief, India and Sri Lanka have provided tea drinkers with four types of flavorsome and brisk teas – self-drinking tea, single-estate tea, seasonal tea and blended tea.

Single-estate teas are “single-malt Scotches” of the tea world – tea masters source these unblended, pure teas from specific tea gardens

Generally, the plucking standard for black tea in the most tea-producing countries is a hand-plucked bud and two leaves. This is preferable than motor-driven leaf cutters which removes more than just the leaf. As a result, the flavour of these teas is inferior to tea made from carefully plucked tea leaf of the same size that is carefully and intentionally plucked by hand.

english black tea and chinese black tea cup

Health Benefits

During the rolling process in manufacturing black teas, the cells release the natural internal leaf juices (or cell sap) contained within the tea leaves. The next step, roll-breaking, allows the internal leaf enzymes and polyphenols to mix and spread evenly throughout the leaf and sets the stage for polyphenols to absorb oxygen during the early stages of the oxidation process.

These polyphenols are also a type of antioxidant that can help remove free radicals and decrease cell damage in the body. Additionally, it may help decrease the risk of chronic disease.

There is evidence that black tea enhances mental alertness, as would be expected because of its caffeine content.

Read more: Antioxidants – Why Do You Need Them?

Grades of Black Tea

There are no universal standard for grading black tea. For instance, grades of Indian black tea can be categorized into whole leaf, broken leaf and CTC (crush, tear and curl) teas. However, in China, depending on the tea garden, a tea might have a great deal of information presented about it. The information may include the country of origin, specific region, years of harvest, season of pluck and method of manufacture.

All in all, it is necessary to cultivate a relationship with a trustworthy tea brand. As you become familiar with our teas, you will in essence become familiar with our criteria for selection. This will prove to be more valuable to your enjoyment of tea than any complex, universal system of standards could ever be.

p.s. Shop for our Black Tea Collection.

 

Classic leaf styles

  • Twist or curly
  • Spiral or crimped
  • Needle or wiry
  • Ball or rolled
  • Broken leaf
  • CTC
  • Granular
  • Fannings
black tea being poured into chinese tea pot

Taste components

  • Aromatic
  • Astringent
  • Biscuity
  • Bold
  • Brisk
  • Colory
  • Coppery
  • Crisp
  • Full
  • Lingering finish
  • Malty
  • Nutty
  • Point
  • Short-finished
  • Smoky
  • Spicy
  • Strength
  • Sweet
vast tea plantation
pouring black tea from tea pot into tea cup

Steeping Black Tea

Black tea is best drunk however you like it – plain or with the addition of milk and sugar or with a squeeze of lemon to accentuate astringency. The following measurements will work whether you are using a ‘gaiwan’ or teapot.

  • 2 tablespoons of leafy tea (per 175ml of water)
  • 1 teaspoon for orange pekoe grades of CTC
  • Temperature: 85 – 95°C
  • Steeping time: 3 ½ minutes for small leaf or CTC tea; 3 ½ – 5 minutes for orthodox leaf

    Read more: Tea Brewing Instructions

    Read more: 3 Black Tea Pairing Tips for Beginner

    The Role of Black Tea

    tea farmer plucking tea in plantation

    CHINA

    Interestingly, black tea is the least-consumed class of tea in China. China produces only a small quantity of black teas – less than 15% of their yearly production. But there are many exquisite and very high quality black teas (e.g. Lapsang Souchong, Keemun Black tea) from provinces such as Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong and others.

    The sweet, soft nature of leaf plucked from China bush varietals provides an underlying delicious, non-astringent flavour that is enhanced by the distinct Chinese style of withering and oxidation.

    Chinese teas rely on the sweet-tasting buds to plump up the flavour of the tea because buds are richest in amino acids and polyphenols. That is why the Chinese black teas are smoother, sweeter, juicier and more buttery than black teas from other sources.

    SRI LANKA

    Tea was first cultivated in Ceylon by the English in 1875. In the mid-nineteenth century, the British began to plant tea bushes on the island to replace the coffee plantations which were wiped out by succession of devastating coffee blights. Sri Lanka benefits from an excellent location and geography, and it has an enviable climate with a unique mix of temperature, moisture and wind that greatly benefits the profile of these teas.

    Generally, the teas are brisk and full-bodied, not flowery or robust. Tea connoisseurs prize the thirst quenching highland teas for their fragrant aromas and bright colors which range from golden to coppery. Roleaf sources most of our black teas from Sri Lanka (e.g. Elegant Earl Grey, Everyday English Breakfast).

    INDIA

    India produces black tea in a diverse group of fifteen states. Generally, 60-75% of total tea production is Assam tea, 1% is Darjeeling and 25% is Nilgiri and the balance is comprised of lesser-known teas.

    The majority of Assam’s black tea is manufactured into CTC tea, contributing overall strength and body to black tea blends (primarily sold in tea bag form). Darjeeling tea gardens thrive at elevations from 1,800 to 6,300 feet in a mountainous area in the northern state of West Bengal. Because the cool thin air at higher elevations slows leaf maturation, this concentrates the flavor in the leaves, giving these teas a well-defined and precise flavor profile.

    AFRICA

    It was only in 1903 that tea farmers planted the first tea bushes on a two-acre tract in Kenya. Now, Kenya ranked third in world production of black tea in 2008. Kenya teas are vigorous, flavorful and full-bodied in style.

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    It is no question that tea lovers tout green tea as THE miracle tea of choice. But what about its counterpart, the black tea? Don’t brush it off just yet. Scientists have discovered a whole host of health benefits linked to it. 

    read more

    Black Tea 101

    By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle. Eventually, it became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company.

    read more

    Tea Brewing Instructions

    Tea Brewing Instructions

    We offer a wide range of teas from all around the world.

    Hence, understandably, it is a little difficult to remember the brewing methods and temperature.

    Because of that, we have prepared a Tea Lovers Handbook to help you get started on your tea journey. These are some of the tips from the Handbook.

    1. Black Teas

    Black Tea is one of the most commonly drank tea. It is more oxidized than the other types of teas. Some of the most renowned black teas are Earl Grey Tea, English Breakfast Tea, Darjeeling Tea and various others.

    Brewing Time: 3 to 4 minutes

    Brewing Temperature: 100° C

    – Read 3 Black Tea Pairing tips for Beginner

    2. Green Teas

    Tea farmers steam freshly harvested tea leaves to make green teas. As compared to other fermented teas, it contains more antioxidants and minimal oxidation.

    Ancient Japanese textbooks have recommended it, e.g. to improve concentration. In addition, today, its healing powers are the subject of much scientific research.

    Brewing Time: 2-3 minutes

    Brewing Temperature: 80° C

    Read more: 3 Green Tea Pairing Tips for Beginner

    Read more: Green Tea 101

    3. Oolong Teas

    Oolong is a semi-fermented tea produced in China through a unique process of withering and oxidation prior to curling and twisting. Its secret lies in the fermentation of the leaf’s outer edges, while the heart of the leaf remains unfermented. In fact, the extent of oxidation of the teas will produce very different taste and aroma.

    Oolong tea is very popular among the Chinese community in south China and Southeast Asia. Indeed, some of the most famous Oolong teas are such as Tie Kuan Yin and Da Hong Pao.

    Brewing Time: 1 to 2 minutes

    Brewing Temperature: 80° C

    Read more: 2 Oolong Tea Pairing Tips for Beginner

    4. Herbal and Fruit Teas

    Generally, there are many types of herbs and it is non-caffeinated. In fact, ancient civilisations have treasured and recommended herbal teas for their beneficial effects on the nerves and internal organs.

    On the other hand, the basic ingredients of fruit tea are apple, hibiscus and rose hip. A tea master can mix herbs or fruit teas with different types of teas to create a fun and fruity tea blend. However, in recent times, more types of ingredients have been used to create exciting new flavours.


    Brewing Time: 4 to 5 minutes

    Brewing Temperature: 100° C

    5. Matcha

    Matcha is a Japanese green powdered tea that is harvested from shade-grown tea leaves which are high in chlorophyll levels. Therefore, it has a complex and rich taste with smooth finishing. We do highly recommended it for its tremendous health benefits.

    Brewing Time: 1 to 2 minutes

    Brewing Temperature: 80° C

    Read more: Matcha 101

    Please share and comment below if these tips have been very helpful to you. 

    If you want more insight into the history, origin and types of teas, then scroll down and sign up to download your FREE pdf.

     

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    5 Tips to Get Past a Full Day of Work Without Dozing Off

    5 Tips to Get Past a Full Day of Work Without Dozing Off

    Work blues got you dozing off? Feeling sluggish and working from home because of restrictive movement caused by Covid19?

    Getting scolded by your boss for not picking up calls? Here are a few tips to stay awake at home without your usual coffee shots.

    1. Turn the lights up

    Maximize your body’s exposure to light.The circadian rhythm, which responds to light – or lack of, regulates our bodies greatly. Therefore, the brighter it is at work, the more likely your body will excrete the right hormones for you to stay alert and productive. Also open all the windows and turn on all the neon lights you can. Don’t forget to increase your screen brightness. 

    2. Music

    Listen to the right kind of beats as music acts as a stimulant for our brains.. ‘How do you sleep’ by John Lennon may not be the best option.  In fact, if the extra focus is what you need, classic instrumental music works best. On the other hand, if an extra motivational jolt is required, try hip hop, dance, or electro beats. Remember, plug in those earphones so you don’t distract your family!

    3. Snack right

    Go for low Glycemic Index (GI) foods that can sustain energy for a longer period of time. Slow digesting carbs high in protein and fiber are good bets, e.g. nuts, fruits, peanut butter & protein bars. Equally important, avoid sugary snacks/drinks that will cause you to crash and burn after an initial rush.

    4. Get moving

    When all you do is sit and hunch over your work desk, it is easy to be dozing off. Do some jumping jacks or air squats. Even head to the pantry and get a cup of tea. Stretch! In brief, do anything to get some blood flowing and your senses activated again. Truly, a little movement goes a long, long way.

    5. Drink up and don’t sleep!

    You can never go wrong with tea because it gives you the right amount of caffeine to keep you sustained throughout an entire workday. Furthermore, tea gives you all the alertness without any of the crashes that come with coffee. Green tea and black tea are fantastic to sip on throughout the day.

    These few hacks are bound to amp up your productivity and alertness while working from home. Good luck!

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    It is no question that tea lovers tout green tea as THE miracle tea of choice. But what about its counterpart, the black tea? Don’t brush it off just yet. Scientists have discovered a whole host of health benefits linked to it. 

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    Black Tea 101

    By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle. Eventually, it became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company.

    read more

    3 Black Tea Pairing Tips for Beginner

    3 Black Tea Pairing Tips for Beginner

    Do you love black tea but find it too mysterious?

    Wish the journey of enjoying teas could be simpler?

    We explored the keys and nuances to tea pairing of green tea – how the right kind of teas can perfectly complement and enhance your meals for a sensory bomb explosion.

    Now we want to guide you on how to perfectly pair black tea!

    Remember, an important key in tea pairing is that they should complement, and not override each other. 

    Black tea is full bodied and has an extremely robust flavour due to its high tannin content, thus it should be paired with full flavoured dishes to prevent overriding.

    1. Smoky Black Tea

    Smoky teas can have varying degrees of smokiness. The teas are usually dried and smoked over smouldering pine boughs, which allows varying amount of smoke to permeate the tea leaves. As the taste is quite intense, it should be paired with dark meats, grilled red meats, blue cheese and dark chocolate.

    e.g. Lapsang Souchong

    2. Earthy Black Tea

    Earthy teas with an earthy flavour and crispy feel is a good base for flavoured teas. This tea usually grows in areas with high amounts of rainfall. Such teas will enhance the flavour of earthy foods such as hearty stews, gravies and vegetables.

    e.g. Chava Chai & Keemun Tea

    3. Fruity Black Tea

    There is a great variety of fruity tea. It can be paired with different types of food. Regardless, fruity teas are amazing when paired with sweet desserts. Its richness perfectly complements sweet, rich and creamy desserts, such as a decadent and luscious chocolate cake. 

    e.g. Elegant Earl Grey & Lotus Blossom Tea

    There is much that you can pair black teas with. Hope these tips help you to serve the right teas to your dinner guests confidently!

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    Black Tea Goodness

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    Black Tea 101

    By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle. Eventually, it became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company.

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