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Matcha Granola Yoghurt Recipe

Matcha Granola Yoghurt Recipe

Matcha granola yoghurt is a scrumptious mixture of golden clusters of oats with rich and delicious yoghurt with fine matcha.

roleaf matcha granola yoghurt recipe in transparent glass

Servings

1 – 2

Ready In:

5min

Good For:

Breakfast and as a mid-day snack

Matcha Granola Yoghurt Recipe

When we were writing our previous Matcha Granola Recipe (go check out if you haven’t), we asked if there was another great way to eat granola? The versatility of granola gave us so many options. For instance, some likes it with yoghurt, some with milk and some just eat by the spoonful! After much thoughts, we came out with one of our favourite combinations here at Roleaf: Matcha Granola with Yoghurt. We hope you like this recipe as much as we do.

In brief, a simple and healthy snack to power you through the day!

 

roleaf matcha granola with yoghurt top view

Ingredients

  • 1-2 tsp of Matcha
  • 1/2 cup of yoghurt/Greek yoghurt
  • 1 tbsp of honey/maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup of granola

TIP: Use Greek yoghurt if you like a thicker consistency!

Step by Step Instructions

Step 1

Firstly, you should already have granola on hand! Otherwise, you can bake some using our Matcha Granola Recipe.

Step 2

Scoop half a cup of your favourite yoghurt into a bowl.

 Step 3

Mix 1-2 teaspoon of matcha and a tablespoon of honey with the yoghurt until well incorporated – producing a smooth consistency.

Step 4

Grab a cup or a bowl and start layering the granola with the matcha yoghurt.

Step 5
    Top it off with your favourite condiments. We used toasted coconut flakes but you could also use fresh blueberries, strawberries, bananas, chocolate chips or anything that tickles your fancy.

So have you figured out your favourite granola combination? Share it with us!

Black Tea Goodness

Black Tea Goodness

It is no question that tea lovers tout green tea as THE miracle tea of choice. But what about its counterpart, the black tea? Don’t brush it off just yet. Scientists have discovered a whole host of health benefits linked to it. 

black tea goodness health benefits

What is Black Tea?

It is produced from the same kind of plant the green tea is – Camellia Sinensis. The only difference is how tea farmers process it. Leaves are withered, rolled, heated and then fermented and heated in order to produce delicious tea leaves.

Read more: Black Tea 101

Here are some of its health benefits.

Read more: Antioxidants – Why Do You Need Them?

black tea with muffin and journal
black tea in transparent tea pot

Health Benefits of Black Tea

1. Stress Relief

Black tea is ample in L-theanine, which helps you relax and concentrate. Regular consumption has also been found to lower cortisol levels.

2. Immune System Boost

It has alkylamine antigens and tannins which support the immune system, helping to ward off common everyday illnesses such as the flu and the tummy bug.

3. Lowers High Cholesterol

Research conducted by the American Heart Association concluded that black tea was associated with slower age-related decreases in HDL-C concentrations which is beneficial in reducing bad cholesterol, thus lowering the risk of heart strokes. People who drink 3-4 cups a day seems to be at a lower risk than people who consumed none at all. [1]

4. Oral Health

The Tea Trade Health Research Association discovered that it helps eliminate plaque formation. It seems to inhibit the growth of bacteria that promotes cavity formation and tooth decay. This is due to the polyphenol content that kill bacteria and the enzymes they create which bind plaque to the tooth enamel.

5. Energy Boost

It contains caffeine, albeit not in the skyrocket amounts that coffee does. It is sufficient however to provide a long lasting and steady boost of energy and mental clarity throughout the day.

What are you waiting for? Brew yourself some black tea goodness and drink up!

p.s. Shop for our Black Tea Collection.

References

[1] From Journal of the American Heart Association, (2018, June). Tea Consumption and Longitudinal Change in High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentration in Chinese Adultshttps://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.118.008814

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Black Tea Goodness

It is no question that tea lovers tout green tea as THE miracle tea of choice. But what about its counterpart, the black tea? Don’t brush it off just yet. Scientists have discovered a whole host of health benefits linked to it. 

read more

Black Tea 101

By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle. Eventually, it became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company.

read more

Black Tea 101

Black Tea 101

By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle.

Eventually, tea became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company. Generally, fully oxidized black tea became the favorite tea among European tea drinkers.

Even though China produces heavenly black teas, it is the least consumed class of tea in China. However, it is most widely consumed in India and Sri Lanka (formerly known as Ceylon during the British colonial days) and the West. In brief, India and Sri Lanka have provided tea drinkers with four types of flavorsome and brisk teas – self-drinking tea, single-estate tea, seasonal tea and blended tea.

Single-estate teas are “single-malt Scotches” of the tea world – tea masters source these unblended, pure teas from specific tea gardens

Generally, the plucking standard for black tea in the most tea-producing countries is a hand-plucked bud and two leaves. This is preferable than motor-driven leaf cutters which removes more than just the leaf. As a result, the flavour of these teas is inferior to tea made from carefully plucked tea leaf of the same size that is carefully and intentionally plucked by hand.

english black tea and chinese black tea cup

Health Benefits

During the rolling process in manufacturing black teas, the cells release the natural internal leaf juices (or cell sap) contained within the tea leaves. The next step, roll-breaking, allows the internal leaf enzymes and polyphenols to mix and spread evenly throughout the leaf and sets the stage for polyphenols to absorb oxygen during the early stages of the oxidation process.

These polyphenols are also a type of antioxidant that can help remove free radicals and decrease cell damage in the body. Additionally, it may help decrease the risk of chronic disease.

There is evidence that black tea enhances mental alertness, as would be expected because of its caffeine content.

Read more: Antioxidants – Why Do You Need Them?

Grades of Black Tea

There are no universal standard for grading black tea. For instance, grades of Indian black tea can be categorized into whole leaf, broken leaf and CTC (crush, tear and curl) teas. However, in China, depending on the tea garden, a tea might have a great deal of information presented about it. The information may include the country of origin, specific region, years of harvest, season of pluck and method of manufacture.

All in all, it is necessary to cultivate a relationship with a trustworthy tea brand. As you become familiar with our teas, you will in essence become familiar with our criteria for selection. This will prove to be more valuable to your enjoyment of tea than any complex, universal system of standards could ever be.

p.s. Shop for our Black Tea Collection.

 

Classic leaf styles

  • Twist or curly
  • Spiral or crimped
  • Needle or wiry
  • Ball or rolled
  • Broken leaf
  • CTC
  • Granular
  • Fannings
black tea being poured into chinese tea pot

Taste components

  • Aromatic
  • Astringent
  • Biscuity
  • Bold
  • Brisk
  • Colory
  • Coppery
  • Crisp
  • Full
  • Lingering finish
  • Malty
  • Nutty
  • Point
  • Short-finished
  • Smoky
  • Spicy
  • Strength
  • Sweet
vast tea plantation
pouring black tea from tea pot into tea cup

Steeping Black Tea

Black tea is best drunk however you like it – plain or with the addition of milk and sugar or with a squeeze of lemon to accentuate astringency. The following measurements will work whether you are using a ‘gaiwan’ or teapot.

  • 2 tablespoons of leafy tea (per 175ml of water)
  • 1 teaspoon for orange pekoe grades of CTC
  • Temperature: 85 – 95°C
  • Steeping time: 3 ½ minutes for small leaf or CTC tea; 3 ½ – 5 minutes for orthodox leaf

    Read more: Tea Brewing Instructions

    Read more: 3 Black Tea Pairing Tips for Beginner

    The Role of Black Tea

    tea farmer plucking tea in plantation

    CHINA

    Interestingly, black tea is the least-consumed class of tea in China. China produces only a small quantity of black teas – less than 15% of their yearly production. But there are many exquisite and very high quality black teas (e.g. Lapsang Souchong, Keemun Black tea) from provinces such as Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong and others.

    The sweet, soft nature of leaf plucked from China bush varietals provides an underlying delicious, non-astringent flavour that is enhanced by the distinct Chinese style of withering and oxidation.

    Chinese teas rely on the sweet-tasting buds to plump up the flavour of the tea because buds are richest in amino acids and polyphenols. That is why the Chinese black teas are smoother, sweeter, juicier and more buttery than black teas from other sources.

    SRI LANKA

    Tea was first cultivated in Ceylon by the English in 1875. In the mid-nineteenth century, the British began to plant tea bushes on the island to replace the coffee plantations which were wiped out by succession of devastating coffee blights. Sri Lanka benefits from an excellent location and geography, and it has an enviable climate with a unique mix of temperature, moisture and wind that greatly benefits the profile of these teas.

    Generally, the teas are brisk and full-bodied, not flowery or robust. Tea connoisseurs prize the thirst quenching highland teas for their fragrant aromas and bright colors which range from golden to coppery. Roleaf sources most of our black teas from Sri Lanka (e.g. Elegant Earl Grey, Everyday English Breakfast).

    INDIA

    India produces black tea in a diverse group of fifteen states. Generally, 60-75% of total tea production is Assam tea, 1% is Darjeeling and 25% is Nilgiri and the balance is comprised of lesser-known teas.

    The majority of Assam’s black tea is manufactured into CTC tea, contributing overall strength and body to black tea blends (primarily sold in tea bag form). Darjeeling tea gardens thrive at elevations from 1,800 to 6,300 feet in a mountainous area in the northern state of West Bengal. Because the cool thin air at higher elevations slows leaf maturation, this concentrates the flavor in the leaves, giving these teas a well-defined and precise flavor profile.

    AFRICA

    It was only in 1903 that tea farmers planted the first tea bushes on a two-acre tract in Kenya. Now, Kenya ranked third in world production of black tea in 2008. Kenya teas are vigorous, flavorful and full-bodied in style.

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    read more

    Black Tea 101

    By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle. Eventually, it became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company.

    read more

    Crunchy Matcha Granola Recipe

    Crunchy Matcha Granola Recipe

    Matcha granola is a scrumptious mixture of golden clusters of oats, toasted coconut pieces, raw almonds and dried cranberries. Deliciously sweetened by pure maple syrup and balanced with the earthiness and umami of matcha  

    Servings

    8

    Ready In:

    1hour 15min

    Good For:

    Anytime!

    Crunchy Matcha Granola Recipe

    This is a perfect recipe for those who are looking for a healthy alternative to your traditional cereal breakfast. We love the versatility of granola because you can eat it for breakfast, dessert or even as a snack on the go. Making your own granola mix is not only affordable but super fun and simple to do.  Your wallet will not feel the pinch, but your tummy will be contented! 

    Generally, you have complete control of what goes into your granola – you can add your favourite nuts, dried fruits or even chocolate chips if you desire.  

     

    matcha granola spread with many ingredients

    Origin of Granola

    For those who have yet to experience the delectable taste of Granola, it is indeed a must-try. Generally, granola consists of a mixture of rolled oats, nuts, dried fruits and sometimes confectionary. A type of oil is then added to the mixture and baked together until golden brown. It can be eaten on its own, but is infinitely inviting on top of desserts or accompanied with Greek yoghurt, fresh fruits or honey!

    Before Granola was invented, grains like oats were usually eaten cooked. In fact, eating it cold was extremely dry, unpleasant and almost unpalatable. It was not until a man by the name of James Caleb Jackson who experimented with baking grains came up with a cereal and named it ‘granula‘. Subsequently, John Harvey Kellogg (does his name ring a bell?) also came up with another similar cereal, but named it granola after facing legal issues with using the term granula. In brief, that was how Granola was birthed.

    Ingredients

    The best part of making granola is the freedom to choose your ingredients. If you are allergic to nuts, alternatively, you can replace them with seeds or dried fruits. Nonetheless, remember to have fun mixing your own granola.

    You can add the matcha powder after baking the granola. If you mix it after baking, it may give an unpleasant mouthfeel of eating powder. However, if you find that there isn’t enough matcha flavor after baking, you can add more matcha powder, but mix it well to reduce the powdery texture.  

    Dry Ingredients

    • 3 cups of rolled oats
    • 1 cup of nuts (we used almonds)
    • 1/2 cup of seeds (we used sunflower seeds)
    • 1/2 cup of toasted coconut pieces or coconut flakes
    • 1/2 cup of dried berries (we used cranberries)
    • 1/2 tsp of sea-salt (or 1/4 tsp of table-salt)

    Wet Ingredients

    • 1/4 cup of maple syrup (alternatively, you can use honey)
    • 1/4 cup of coconut oil
    • 2.5 tbsp of Matcha
    • 1 tsp of vanilla extract (optional) 
    • 3 tbsp of brown sugar (optional)

    Step by Step Instructions

    Step 1

    Firstly, mix the oats, nuts, seeds and salt together in a big bowl and set aside. Do not add the dried fruit and toasted coconut yet.

    dry ingredients of matcha granola
    Step 2

    Secondly, mix the coconut oil and maple syrup with the matcha in a smaller bowl until incorporated. Additionally, you can also add vanilla extract and brown sugar.

    pre mix of matcha granola
    Step 3

    Drizzle the wet mixture over the dry ingredients. Mix well until well coated.

      mixed matcha granola
      Step 4

      Spread the mixture on a baking sheet and bake for 1 hour at 150 degrees.

      pre baked matcha granola
      Step 5

      Take the mixture out of the oven and mix with the dried fruits and toasted coconut pieces. Wait until cool and dig into your matcha granola!

        baked matcha granola

        How do you prefer to eat your granola? Comment down below and share with us your tips and stand a chance to win some goodies when our next recipe blogpost is up.

        Green Tea 101

        Green Tea 101

        Civilisations in China and Japan have been using green tea for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. Green tea is tea in its purest form because tea makers have minimal room to alter its production techniques.

        It is absolutely crucial in its manufacturing process to prevent oxidation of the fresh leaf and preserve the natural green color. In most cases, tea farmers will lightly steam fresh leaves from the plant to produce it.

        Green tea offers many different leaf styles and flavor characteristics. Without doubt, tea connoisseurs will delight in its transitory tastes and sweet-smelling aromas that are fresh, delicious and uncomplicated.

        Tea plantations produce it year-round in subtropical locations, but only at specific times in the warm months in temperate zones. This corresponds to the specific varieties of camellia sinensis grown in these dissimilar places. The quality of the leaf generally relates to the time of year and number of plucks (harvests) per year.

        In regions of the world in which the tropical sub varieties of camellia sinensis, such as assam bush or java bush grow, leaf for green tea may be plucked all year-round.  

        green tea 101 tea bag in cup with flower jar and teabags

        Health Benefits

        Drinkers are currently using green tea as a beverage or dietary supplement to relieve digestive symptoms and headaches. It is also used to improve mental alertness and promote weight loss.

        Although many studies have been done, researchers still have yet to obtain definite conclusions on its health benefits. However, limited evidence available suggests that it might have beneficial effects on some heart disease risk factors, including blood pressure and cholesterol.

        There’s evidence that green tea enhances mental alertness, as would be expected because of its caffeine content. [1]

        Read more: 3 Green Tea Tips for Weight Loss

        Read more: Antioxidants – Why Do You Need Them?

        Grades of Green Tea

        The terminology used to designate grades of green tea can differ widely, because no universal standard exists for grading it. Hence, this complexity and lack of standardization can be confusing. For example, some may use the term imperial to designate the top grade of a particular tea. Others may label the same as premium. In brief, tea buyers should seek high quality tea at reasonable prices.

        Buyers can find it difficult to know whether a certain tea is more expensive than another because it is overpriced or of a higher grade. There will be no resolution to this because the tea industry cannot possibly codify the thousands of green teas available, so it is necessary to cultivate a relationship with a trustworthy tea brand. As you become familiar with our teas, you will in essence become familiar with our criteria for selection. This will prove to be more valuable to your enjoyment of tea than any complex, universal system of standards could ever be.

        However, premium green teas tend to follow a specific plucking standard. Generally, it is plucked early in the spring and have certain country-specific particulars.

        Chinese wisdom in the tea garden dictates, “tea that is picked early is a treasured; picked late, it’s trash.

        Because it is processed so minimally, the size of the leaf before manufacture has a critical impact on the flavor of the finished tea.

        p.s. Shop for our Green Tea Collection.

         

        Classic leaf styles

        • Bud-only; sword or sparrow’s tongue
        • Budset; sword or twisted needle
        • Open or leafy
        • Flat of flaky
        • Twist
        • Spiral or crimped
        • Needle or wiry
        • Ball or rolled
        • Compressed
        loose leaf green tea

        Taste components

        • Aromatic
        • Astringent
        • Body – varies from light to full
        • Bright
        • Character
        • Clean
        • Crisp
        • Fresh
        • Grassy
        • Green
        • Herbaceous
        • Kelpy
        • Lingering finish
        • Mineral
        • Soft
        • Spicy
        • Strength
        • Sweet
        • Vegetal
        tea plantation
        chinese green tea in clay cups in bamboos

        Steeping Green Tea

        The first harvest of teas in the spring season will fill the mouth with fresh, delicious flavors that are sweet and refreshing. Being more delicate than most other classes of tea, green tea requires steeping water that has cooled from the boil. Water that is too hot will force the leaf to become bitter, rather than encourage it to yield the sweetness inherent in the leaf.

        Teas from China

        • 1 to 2 tablespoons of leafy tea (per 175ml of water)
        • 1 to 2 teaspoons for bud tea
        • Spring teas: 70 – 75°C
        • Other teas: 75 – 80°C
        • Steeping time: 90 seconds to 2 minutes

        Teas from Japan

        • 1 to 2 teaspoons (per 175ml of water)

        • Steeping temperature: 70 – 75°C

        • Steeping time: 90 seconds to 2 minutes

        Read more: Tea Brewing Instructions

        Read more: 3 Green Tea Pairing Tips for Beginner

        The Role of Green Tea

        green tea being dried in baskets

        CHINA

        Green tea has been the most popular form of tea in China since the Southern Song dynasty. In fact, approximately 70 percent of China’s yearly output of tea is green tea. Generally, there are almost ten thousand distinctions of it produced in China’s eastern provinces of Anhui, Henan, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi and Zhejiang and the western provinces of Sichuan, Guizhou and Yunnan.

        China’s most delicious green teas are delicate, fresh, and clean. Some possess vegetal flavors in the cup whilst others are earthy and grassy in style, reflecting the cool climate and austere soil found high in the tea mountains.

        JAPAN

        Buddhist monks brought tea seeds to Japan in the early 9th century. Most green tea consumed in Japan is produced on this small but intensively farmed country of islands. Japanese tea enthusiasts are deeply connected to the flavor of Japanese tea. They are also rarely attracted to the tea offerings of other countries.

        The flavor of Japanese tea is vivid, striking and vegetal, which makes it unique and deliciously refreshing any time of the day. In the cup, the best Japanese teas feature both astringency and controllable attribute of tea that has been finely honed by Japanese tea artisans.

        In contrast to China, Japan historically produces only one major class of tea – green tea. Japan’s green teas are usually dark, forest green, thin and needle-shaped. Underscoring this selective focus is the additional fact that Japanese tea makers produce only a scant handful of green tea varieties, a distinction that highly contrasts with that of neighboring China.

        Emphasis is not on specific tea gardens or famous mountains, but on distinctions that differentiate the teas from larger geographical areas such as Shizuoka, Kyushu and central Honshu.

        We source our high quality Japanese teas from Yame, Japan – highly renowned for their premium quality.

        In Japan, tea should exhibit three necessary traits: good aroma, taste and appearance.

        Read more: Matcha 101

        [1] From National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, (2016, November). Green Teahttps://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/green-tea

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        read more

        Black Tea 101

        By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644), the culture of tea drinking was growing in the West. But black tea did not find appreciative drinkers until the Dutch embraced Chinese tea after 1640, when Dutch traders introduced tea to society patrons in Hague and it became a fashionable lifestyle. Eventually, it became the most sought-after trade commodity of the English East India Company.

        read more